From the Archives: Barnaby Hall

As a 2003-2004 Hine Fellow, Barnaby Hall was  placed with the PACOS (Partners of Community Organizations) Trust in Sabah, Malaysia. PACOS is a community-based organization created to develop the overall quality of life of indigenous communities in Sabah, Malaysia’s second largest state. By documenting the history of these communities, which are located in forested land that is being razed for oil palm plantations, PACOS works for the legal recognition of indigenous people’s land rights.

David Blocher 2004-2005

David Blocher graduated from Duke University in 2004. As a student, his photography focused on American consumerism and Durham’s changing cultural landscape. During this time, he worked with the Scrap Exchange in Durham teaching the principles of “Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle” by facilitating workshops in which children were encouraged to expand their minds as they transformed industrial scrap into abstract art. He also taught photography classes and helped direct a summer art camp at the Art Center in Carrboro.

As a Jessica Jennifer Cohen/Lewis Hine Fellow, David worked with the non-governmental organization Persatuan Guru Tadika (PGT) in Taiping, Malaysia. PGT emphasizes preschool education for the children of Tamil workers on plantations in Malaysia and is noted for incorporating Tamil traditions into its educational format. In addition to helping in the preschool classrooms and teaching weekly photography lessons, David curated multimedia exhibitions about estate life through photographs and voice recordings. The exhibitions are intended to spark community discussions about estate life and give a broader context to the children’s photographic work.

Barnaby Hall 2003-2004

Barnaby Hall, a 2003 Duke graduate in history, is a photographer with an interest in local and indigenous communities. He worked in Cambodia and Afghanistan while an undergraduate. As an intern in Cambodia, from February to May 2001, Barnaby documented the efforts of the Center of Khmer Studies in Siem Reap, a non-governmental organization dedicated to study, teaching, and research on Khmer civilization and the cultures on the Mekong. Barnaby photographed for the UNFPA in Kabul, Afghanistan, during the summer of 2002. His photographs have been published in the New York Times, Financial Times, the Evening Standard (London) and the Duke Magazine.

Barnaby was a Lewis Hine Fellow at the PACOS Trust (Partners of Community Organizations), a community-based organization created to develop the overall quality of life of indigenous communities in Sabah, Malaysia. PACOS is documenting the history of indigenous communities located in forested land that is being razed for palm oil plantations. Through this documentation, the organization works for legal recognition of indigenous people’s land rights.

To learn more about Barnaby’s work visit:

http://documentarystudies.duke.edu/projects/hine/gallery/barnaby-hall