Kamal Badhey 2016-2017

kamalKamal Badhey is a photographer, educator and visual urbanist from New York.   She has focused on ideas of dispersal, diaspora and origin pilgrimages, using photography and the narratives of places, people, and objects to stitch together stories. Her work and sense of home follows the childhood saying told to her in Telugu, ’Katha kanchiki, manam intiki’,  ‘The story goes far far away, and now we are back in our homes’.  Her project Portals and Passageways is part of a collection of photographs from a reconstructed family album. They are based on the collective story of her extended family in Secunderabad, India, starting with her oldest known ancestor and great great grandfather, jeweler Annam Rathnaiah.

Kamal’s work in the Exhibitions Program at the Center for Documentary Studies with Courtney Reid-Eaton allowed her to re-envision the documentary canon.  She received her MA in Photography and Urban Cultures from Goldsmiths, University of London and her MS in Museum and General Education from Bank Street College.  She has engaged with a variety of communities, but her most significant experience was as a visual arts teacher at Cypress Hills Community School in Brooklyn, New York, where she taught for seven years.   Teaching art allowed her to create opportunities for spontaneity, pure expression, and dialogue as well as share agency with her students.  Her belief is that places of safety and creativity allow people to build on their strengths while creating a deep sense of autonomy.  She says the Hine Fellowship gives her the opportunity to listen deeply, as well as bridge her love for people, storytelling and photography.

Kamal will be working with Friends of the Children of New York. To see her work, visit her website.

Lauren Henschel 2016-2017

hine-bio-henschelLauren sees documentary arts as a catalyst for empathy. Diagnosed in 2009 with psoriatic
arthritis, a painful autoimmune disease, she turned to her art as an escape.  Instead she discovered a way to express her struggle, and people listened. Lauren’s journey through pain inspired her to turn her lens and soul outward – attempting to help others suffering find solace through the documentary process and inviting viewers to observe.

Emboldened by her goal, Lauren chose to continue her education at Duke University (AB 2015) largely because of its Center for Documentary Studies. There she found peers and professors who affirmed her passion and nurtured her talent. Though her technique and skill evolved, Lauren remained committed to a humanistic approach to her work. Lauren’s thesis and first major project, “Indelible,” is an art installation – utilizing still images, audio narratives, and video footage – that presents anonymous stories of individuals with scars and the manifestation of that pain on the human body. The piece was displayed in its original form as black and white photographs at Carnegie Hall and continued to garner acclaim at Duke University as an installation.

After graduating with highest distinction, Lauren utilized funding from a Benenson grant, the Louis Sudler Prize in the Arts, and a few other sources to travel to Peru to seek the roots of a story about a mother and her daughter who abandoned their lives and family in rural Peru to seek improved opportunities in the United States. On her return to the US, Lauren co-founded The Shared Divide, a pending non-profit that creates multimedia content as a narrative for social change. By specifically focusing on the historical narratives of underserved communities, The Shared Divide works to archive endangered historical stories in order to promote the education of future generations about the history of their communities.  Currently, she is working through The Shared Divide with members of the underrepresented Riverside community in South Hampton, New York, to archive its rich history, which traditional historical venues have repeatedly overlooked.

About the Lewis Hine Fellowship Lauren writes, “I am humbled and honored to be a Lewis Hine Fellow and to have the opportunity to collaborate with the Red Hook Community Justice Center. I look forward to being part of a community that is challenging existing structures of justice and creating a more equitable system to build upon. Working in such a uniquely creative and resilient community over the next year will challenge me and help me to grow both artistically and as a person. I look forward to developing documentary projects in collaboration with the Justice Center and residents of the community.”

Lauren will be working with the Red Hook Community Justice Center. To see more of her recent work, visit her website.

Jenny Stratton 2016-2017

jsbiophotocroppedWe photograph from who we are. Jenny Jacklin Stratton’s work springs largely from her migratory upbringing in the Naval Special Warfare community. Over the years her inclination to know more about her own family and surroundings has evolved into a means to engage deeply and share stories with others. Her work often involves long-form collaborations; collectively grappling with personal ethnographies and relationships between how we see and what we know.

Jenny earned a MFA in Experimental & Documentary Arts from Duke University and completed a U.S. Department of State FLAS fellowship in Arab Language and Middle Eastern Studies in 2014. With a background in earth science, she aims to better understand and amplify connections between individuals, communities, ecologies, geologic time and soil. Her thesis, American Soil explores environmental and national narratives of war and the difficulty in understanding transitions made by military and refugee communities. Most recently, American Soil will be on exhibit at the 2016 Terra Madre Salone del Gusto (Turin, Italy) and as part of the Farmers’ Union Women in Agriculture series. Another project, Survived By chronicles the daily details of loss, sense of place and resiliency of surviving spouses and their children. During her time at Duke, the form of these projects grew from from primarily making stop-motion animations and photographs to also include video, writing, sound, recipes, living plants, detritus and reactivating archival materials.

Concurrent with making documentary work, Jenny facilitates workshops and courses for academic institutions, non-profit and grassroots organizations including Vision Workshops, Jana Urban India Foundation, Platteforum Art Lab, Acta Non Verba, The Partnership for Appalachia Girls & Education and Duke University Franklin Humanities Institute.

Jenny is grateful to be a 2016 Hine Documentary Fellow. She writes, “I am incredibly excited by the powerful legacy and premise of the Lewis Hine Fellowship to support humanitarian organizations by utilizing documentary arts as an effective tool for social research and reform. I see this as a meaningful opportunity to work closely with a community, to listen closely and to be fully present in that shared time.”

Jenny will be working with Children’s Aid and Family Services of New Jersey.

To see some of her recent projects, visit National Geographic and this Platte Forum feature.

 

Brenna Cukier 2015-2016

Brenna was born in Tempe, Arizona but moved toBrenna_BioPic Auckland, New Zealand at age ten. She received her B.A. in journalism as a Robertson Scholar at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she reported for the student newscast for two years until she became the executive producer. During her sophomore year, she participated in a component of the Robertson Program known as the “semester switch,” when scholars spend a year in residence at their sister campus. In an effort to find a way to combine her newsroom skills with her passion for creative storytelling, she enrolled in three CDS courses. From that semester onward, she simultaneously pursued these programs at both universities.

By combining videography with her love for travel and her interest in NGOs, Brenna spent her summers documenting the work of various education-focused non-profits around the world, from Atlanta, Georgia, to the Azores Islands to Bali, Indonesia. This summer, Brenna will utilize support from the John Hope Franklin Award with the AJC Goldman Fellowship to make a connection between the work she will be doing at her internship with the Forum for Dialogue Among Nations in Warsaw, Poland with the story of her own family’s history. By re-tracing the steps of her Holocaust-survivor grandparents, she hopes to fill some of the gaps in her identity that she has been curious about since childhood.

Regarding the Lewis Hine Documentary Fellowship, Brenna says, “My past documentary experiences have validated that I thrive in new and challenging environments, and the Hine Fellowship is a new challenge in which I hope to produce meaningful and provocative work. If I have learned anything as a videographer, it’s that we don’t stop looking through a lens when we put the camera down, and I am excited to see how the Fellowship will contribute to my perception of the world and how my perception of the world will contribute to the lives of others.”

Brenna will be working with the Center for Family Life.

To see some of Brenna’s work, please visit her YouTube channel.

Laura Doggett 2015-2016

LCDLaura is a community artist and educator who believes in the transformative power of creative expression and storytelling in the lives of young people. She has spent much of the past twenty years creating opportunities for girls to be heard in their own voices. Through video, audio, writing, theater and visual arts, Laura has worked with girls from underserved and marginalized communities in the Appalachian mountains of KY and WV, the immigrant communities and inner-cities of NYC, Queens, the Bronx and DC, and Jordan’s Syrian refugee camps and urban areas, to express their experiences through various artistic approaches to storytelling. She has seen the tools of documentary arts give girls a sense of agency and power over their own stories and dreams, and is constantly thrilled to see the amazement in girls, whenever they share their artistic work with the public, as they realize the value their voices and visions carry in opening up channels of understanding, dialogue and change. She graduated from Duke University with an MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts in 2013.

On working as a Hine Fellow, Laura says: “I feel incredibly fortunate to have this opportunity to work with an organization full of people who are deeply invested in finding innovative approaches to supporting young people in their communities. I’m excited to see where the young people I will work with take us as they engage with the documentary arts process – using these tools to find a voice that’s distinctive and undeniably their own, and drawing upon their surroundings, memory and imaginations to shape their stories. I hope that together, this young collective of media makers can create a complex and vibrant portrait that reflects what they most want to share about how they see and move through their worlds in this particular landscape of home and time in their lives.”

Laura will be working with Next Generation Center.

To see some of the work from Laura’s workshops in Jordan, please visit:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/middleeast/syria/11201377/Syrias-refugees-Girls-use-photography-to-document-life-in-the-Zaatari-camp.html

http://m.rescue.org/blog/media-workshop-syrian-girls-voice-their-stories-through-film

 

Nicholas Pilarski 2015-2016

Nicholas aims to create art that facilitates a space forNP development and growth through documentary practice. His work focuses on issues that surround social and economic marginalization He uses collaborative art-making approaches that engage with individuals and communities to create dialogue through self-expression.

With experience working in music, theater, and film, Nicholas uses a multidisciplinary approach to inform his work. He has performed in a range of theatrical productions that include acting as a Blue Man with the Blue Man Group in both Chicago and New York City, and has played percussion with various Grammy nominated artists. As an educator he has facilitated master classes on theater methodologies, and most recently, documentary theory. After finishing a degree from the University of Michigan in theater and film, he traveled to West Bengal, India, to work with and learn from the world’s largest Theatre of the Oppressed movement, Jana Sanskriti. There, he concentrated on how theatrical and social techniques developed by the group could influence new-media and documentary.

This experience was fundamental in Nicholas’s decision to obtain an MFA from Duke University in Experimental and Documentary Arts. While at Duke, he worked to connect performance methodologies, Theatre of the Oppressed practices, and computational media to create his thesis project, I, Destini. This animated film explored the poignant and imaginative perspective of a youth grappling with the effects of having an incarcerated loved one. The documentary came to life through a series of creative workshops with Destini (the film’s main character/co-creator) and her family. This process ultimately focused on how documentary practices could foster reciprocal and creative dialog while advocating for social reform. Nicholas hopes to continue to build upon the collaborative documentary process he began developing while working with Destini and her family.

Recent film screenings include Meet the Press at The Indie Grits Film Festival, Columbia, South Carolina; Of Remnants at The Cinedans Film Festival at the National Film Museum, Amsterdam, Netherlands; and Semi-Winged at Abstract Currents at the MoMA and MoMA-PS1, New York, New York.

About the Lewis Hine Fellowship Nicholas writes, “I am excited and honored to be a Lewis Hine Fellow. While supported by the fellowship I hope to help create a space where ideas can be shared freely and personal history can be documented through the process of collaborative self-expression. I can think of no greater privilege than to create work through the optic of activism and education that Lewis Hine helped pave almost a century ago.”

Nicholas will be working with the Brownsville Community Justice Center.

To see some of Nicholas’s work, please visit: http://www.nicholaspilarski.com

Amanda Berg 2014-2015

Berg_headshotTo be a photographer is to be in the world; at the heart of Amanda Berg’s practice is a simple desire to be with people in shared moments and to collect pictures that will remind us of something felt.

Amanda graduated from Duke University with an MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts in 2014. Prior to that, she received a BFA in photojournalism from Rochester Institute of Technology. While at RIT, she began documenting the culture of female undergraduate drinking. In 2011, this project, Keg Stand Queens, was awarded the Alexia Foundation student grant, which lead to multiple publications and speaking engagements.

After graduating from RIT Amanda attended the Eddie Adams Workshop and moved to Fayetteville, North Carolina, where she interned as a full-time photojournalist at the local newspaper. This experience fueled her passion for community journalism that challenges social expectation. While there she was awarded first and second place in “Best Video” of 2012 by the North Carolina Press Association.

During her time at Duke, Amanda explored a range of stories through many mediums, attended the Radius Book Workshop, New York Times Portfolio Review, Flaherty Film Seminar, and worked as a teaching assistant to David Gatten and Alex Harris. This culminated in a thesis film and exhibit about women’s tackle football.

Amanda is grateful to be a 2014 Lewis Hine Documentary Fellow. She says, “There is so much to learn and share about images and people. This is an ideal opportunity to become a more socially aware storyteller, get to know a vibrant new community and work in the legacy of one of the great social observer photographers.”

Amanda is working with with South Bronx United. To see more of Amanda’s work, visit amandaberg.net.

Sarah Stacke 2014-2015

Stacke_BioPIcSarah Stacke is a photographer based in Brooklyn, NY. One of her current documentary projects takes place in Western North Carolina where she photographs the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Nation. Sarah is also working on Love From Manenberg, a long-form documentary project in Cape Town, South Africa, and another project in the Democratic Republic of Congo where she’s developing an archival repository in collaboration with photographers in Kinshasa.

In addition to making photographs, Sarah teaches and generates projects that ask viewers to think critically about cross-cultural visual literacy at Duke’s Center for Documentary Studies. Sarah has written about photography for The New York Times Lens Blog and the Nasher Museum. She is the curator of exhibitions including Keep All You Wish: The Photographs of Hugh Mangum and AfriPost: Epistolary Journeys of African Pictures.

In 2012 she received a Master of Arts from Duke University tailored to research photographic representations of sub-Saharan Africa and the diaspora. Also at Duke, Sarah received certificates in African and African American Studies and Documentary Arts with a focus on multimedia.

Clients and publications include The New York Times, The Atlantic, Time Out New York, Minneapolis Star Tribune, Miami Herald, The Boston Globe, Marie Claire, YMCA, KARIBU Kinshasa, HOPE Cape Town, SONKE Gender Justice Network, and Yéle Haiti.

She began her career as an assistant to Burt Glinn of Magnum Photos.

About being a Lewis Hine Documentary Fellow, Sarah says, “This is an incredible opportunity to work with Exalt Youth, an organization that serves youth in the criminal justice system. As a photographer I’m interested in intersections of culture, history, and geography that have created marginalized communities. The disproportional incarceration rates within black communities have marginalized many people with devastating consequences. Exalt inspires youth at a critical crossroad to believe in their worth and transform themselves to reflect that worth and create lasting change. Documentary has the power to subvert the stereotypes surrounding incarcerated youth, inspire new ways of looking, and motivate people around the related social issues of racism and poverty. I can’t wait to get to work.”

For her fellowship, Sarah is working with Exalt Youth in Brooklyn.

To see more of Sarah’s work, visit: www.sarahstacke.com

 

Natalie Minik 2013-2014

NatalieBioNEW_550
Natalie Minik graduated from Duke University with an MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts in 2013. Her commitment to documentary practice started nine years ago at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies where she studied documentary writing. Since her introduction to the field, she has branched out into photography, moving image and multimedia approaches to storytelling. As a student in the MFA program, she combined photography, audio interviews and moving image to consider women’s lives in relation to their responsibilities and to their dreams. Additionally, she is co-founder of One, One Thousand | A Publication of Southern Photography.

About being a Lewis Hine Documentary Fellow Natalie says, “What excites me about this Hine Fellowship is the chance to honor the stories others have already created by using the documentary arts to get to another level of understanding. The Hine Fellowship legacy is broad and impressive, and I am thrilled to revisit moments in its history, to look back but also to look at the contemporary lives of the people and organizations portrayed. My hope is to create work that shows how documentary can help to give perspective to our lives, and to create pieces that foster a sense of shared community in Boston and beyond.”

Cameron Zohoori 2012-2013

Cameron Zohoori graduated from Duke University with a B.S. in Neuroscience, having taken several film and photography courses at the Center for Documentary Studies as a Robertson Scholar at Duke and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Through CDS, Cameron worked on multimedia projects in the Durham area, including a photo/audio piece for a public elementary school and video pieces for state and local organizing groups on the topic of North Carolina’s foreclosure crisis. In 2009, he worked with the Thousand Kites organization at the Appalshop media collective in Whitesburg, KY, using radio broadcasts as a tool to reconnect Kentucky prisoners with their families.

In 2010, Cameron worked in Sierra Leone, West Africa, doing rural community development work. He returned to neighboring Liberia in 2011 as a media trainer with the Together Liberia project, which helps journalists and media professionals tell the stories of their country using digital storytelling tools. Offering his services to local NGOs, he produced documentary pieces for literacy and youth agriculture organizations. Cameron also published a photo story for Al Jazeera English In Depth and collaboratively shot a feature-length documentary, both on musicians who have lived through Liberia’s civil war and are crafting new genres of music to carry their socially charged messages.

About being a Lewis Hine Documentary Fellow Cameron says, “The images we see every day, the stories we are told, directly shape how we think about our world. I hope to use documentary media to offer up new perspectives and provoke new ways of thinking about the issues facing people and communities. The Hine Fellowship is an amazing opportunity for me to continue learning and exploring these ideas by engaging with new communities and supporting the ongoing work of vital organizations.”

Cameron is working with United Teen Equality Center in Lowell, MA. To see more of Cameron’s work, visit: http://cameronzohoori.com/